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Thread: Worms in the trees

  1. #11
    Forum Diehard
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    Default Re: Worms in the trees

    Quote Originally Posted by Merking View Post
    Tortrix Moth Caterpillars. Thanks TheElench.

    What about these birds I see in all the local parks?

    Quote Originally Posted by madelaine View Post
    Whatever they are they are escapers! Not native.
    They are Ring-necked Parakeets. They either escaped or were deliberately released and have been around for many years. There is a large, increasing population in Southern England especially in the Greater London area.

    T

  2. #12
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    Default Re: Worms in the trees

    Thanks Tony. Their colour gives them excellent camouflage in parks. They're almost invisible in trees.

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Worms in the trees

    Quote Originally Posted by Merking View Post
    Tortrix Moth Caterpillars. Thanks TheElench.

    What about these birds I see in all the local parks?

    Look like Ring-Necked Parakeets. Escaped from captivity and bred to form a colony.



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  4. #14

    Default Re: Worms in the trees

    There Green Feral Rose Ringed Parakeets, lots of them in West London, They estimate there are over 6,000 of them now living in the wild, they believe they all originated from one pair that was released, being mostly seed eaters they survive the winter raiding bird feeders.

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